Our Classroom Process and hours needed for improvement

Here are our estimates for the number of hours you need to study for the ACT based on how large of a point improvement you want:  

  • 0-1 ACT point improvement: 10 hours

  • 1-2 ACT point improvement: 20 hours

  • 2-4 ACT point improvement: 40 hours

  • 4-6 ACT point improvement: 80 hours

  • 6-9 ACT point improvement: 150 hours     

* Busy teens/athletes - 1 Week ACT/SAT Intro Camp in June or July mid to end of Sophomore year  

  • 1st 5 week class Intro to the format and question type breakdown, diagnostic, and introduction of block pattern learning. Last week review and full test practice.  

  • 2nd 5 week class starts on material depending on your scores you bring back from your test. We create worksheets, and practice tests to cover content and pace issues to further your score increase.

  • 3rd and 4th five week class uses new material and worksheets with emphasis on your score increase as well as superscore increase.

NOTE:  THE TIME YOU ARE ABLE TO PUT TOWARD YOUR CLASS, REVIEW, AND PRACTICE WILL DICTATE HOW FAST YOU ARE ABLE TO INCREASE YOUR SCORE. Utilize our “Open Lab” review with tutors to increase your score.

We have found that most students are able to increase on average total 8 points increase from the diagnostic or first test score with no preparation (baseline). When given the opportunity to study for 3/4 testing dates the students are able to improve vastly.  The key is to enroll when you have the time to study. Avoid conflicts w/ sports, plays, dance. Plan around your busy schedule. Our largest score increases come from students who start preparing with a camp or the Intro class as a Sophomore or no later than Sept/Oct of Junior year. They have more time to plan and study. Give yourself a one year window as you prepare.It is a test that you comfortable with when you understand the format, right brain, left brain score increases, and how to study. The anxiety that comes from testing is due to the unknown and the lack of preparation and confidence. Begin early and attack the GPA and standardized test scores together. It is a process that teaches your teen to make a plan and work hard to achieve it. It is the mindset that you want for them to carry into college as they begin preparing for a career.